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Judith spins a yarn

06 Nov

Beata Rosiak, “heads,” tapestry in wool, silk, linen, 130 x 90 cm, http://www.tapisseriedart.com/en/beata-rosiak,19.html

Arras, France was a thriving textile town in the 14th and 15th centuries – specializing in fine wool tapestries, often with gold thread to decorate palaces and castles all over Europe.   Few of these tapestries survived the French Revolution as hundreds were burned to recover the gold thread.   No matter where it was woven, arras is still used to denote to a rich tapestry today.

Beata Rosiak has resurrected this fine art in intricate tapestries that recreate classic works of art.   Of course after the Mona Lisa, (insert trumpets here) Caravaggio’s Judith would be next.   Although the arras tapestry only depicts a portion of Caravaggio’s masterpiece, Rosiak has given it her own spin (yuk, yuk) by transforming the faces of Judith and her maid, than adding other ethereal heads.

I love this look.  It is almost a cartoon version of the original.   And the additional heads give it a sense of the Greek chorus – a collective voice on the dramatic action to help follow the performance and express the hidden fears or secrets that main characters cannot say.   I’m guessing they are singing about doubt and determination, disgust and satisfaction.

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2 Comments

Posted by on November 6, 2012 in Glory

 

Tags: , , , , ,

2 responses to “Judith spins a yarn

  1. Beata Rosiak

    June 13, 2014 at 9:25 am

    It’s me Beata Rosiak performer tapestry, ,,JUDITH”
    Thank you for a good comment to my interpretation of the tapestry.
    This message has just guided me.
    The passions and show our bad emotions that us over the centuries.
    I wanted to show or not the transient beauty of paintings of Renaissance masters.
    REVIVAL-a continuation of the art of this wonderful period.
    I am glad that in the era of contemporary art is someone who is bent over this complicated and not easy art.
    Thank you and greet you with Polish.

     
    • judith2you

      January 2, 2015 at 10:13 pm

      I apologize for my slow response. It is an honor to have your comment on this amazing work. I hope to see it in person someday because I expect it to be more amazing than the pictures.

       

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